Angel Sharks

Angel Sharks are an unusually flat-bodied genus of sharks and grow to a length of 1.5 meter. Angel Sharks once were common in the Northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean, but commercial fishing has decimated the population via bycatch.

Angel Sharks are a now critically endangered species. The Canary Islands, hundred kilometres off the African west coast, are home to the largest remaining Angel Sharks population.

Another particularity of the volcanic Canary Islands is the – at certain spots – abundant number of sea urchins: Diadema antillarum has very long black spines. In contrast to endangered Angel Sharks, the number of sea urchins has exploded as over-fishing has decimated their natural enemies. Urchins extinguish algae – subsequently, the nude rocks do not offer a habitat for dependent marine organisms anymore.

An Angel Shark (Squatina squatina) lies at the rocky ground in Fuerteventura. Angel Sharks were common in the Northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean, but commercial fishing has decimated the population via bycatch. Angel Sharks are a now critically endangered species. The Canary Islands are home to almost all of the remaining Angel Sharks population.
An Angel Shark (Squatina squatina) lies at the rocky ground in Fuerteventura. Angel Sharks were common in the Northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean, but commercial fishing has decimated the population via bycatch. Angel Sharks are a now critically endangered species. The Canary Islands are home to almost all of the remaining Angel Sharks population.
Diving in Fuerteventura.
Diving in Fuerteventura.
School of sardines in disarray.
School of sardines in disarray.