Col d’Izoard

Col d’Izoard is a 2360 m mountain pass in the French Alps categorized as an Hors Categorie climb in the Tour de France. Le Tour first climbed the Col d’Izoard in 1922 – in those days over unpaved roads. There is a memorial near the summit commemorating the epic battles between Fausto Coppi and Louison Bobet in the 1950ies.

The climb from Briançon in the North measures 21.5 kilometers with 1039 meters elevation. The road from Guillestre in the South is longer and the climb even harder (31.5 km / 1361 m). The road on the south side of the pass leads through dramatic rock formations and pinnacles – La Casse Déserte.

As described previously on the blog, I’ve set up a microsite dedicated to the 2014 Tour de France crossing the Col d’Izoard during stage 14. You can find more photos from Col d’Izoard on the previous blog post, some of them taken on film.

This is the third article in a black and white photo series about famous mountains and passes in cycling sport.

Panoramic view of Col d'Izoard (2360 m) with La Casse Deserte on the south.
Panoramic view of Col d’Izoard (2360 m) with La Casse Déserte on the south.
Col d'Izoard is a 2360 m mountain pass in the French Alps. The road on the south side of the pass leads through dramatic rock formations and pinnacles – La Casse Deserte.
Col d’Izoard is a 2360 m mountain pass in the French Alps. The road on the south side of the pass leads through dramatic rock formations and pinnacles – La Casse Déserte.
A cyclist climbs the road to Col d'Izoard (2360 m) leading through dramatic rock formations and pinnacles – La Casse Deserte.
A cyclist climbs the road to Col d’Izoard (2360 m) leading through dramatic rock formations and pinnacles – La Casse Déserte.