Azores Underwater Video

Manta Ray, or Mobula tarapacana, glide through the Atlantic at Princess Alice Bank, Azores. Princess Alice Bank is a volcanic seamount on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge rising from more than two thousand metres to a depth of around 40 metres below the ocean surface.

The Azores are a phantastic spot to see marine life, especially Mobula at Princess Alice Bank. This underwater video is a collaboration with my son who did most of the wide-angle shots, and composed the music. https://vimeo.com/350355983 Diving the Azores.

Diving with Blue Sharks of the Azores

A blue shark (Prionace glauca) swims near Faial, Azores.

Blue sharks populate the waters around the Azores archipelago. They undertake long transatlantic migrations. Offshore diving with these elegant and curious animals allows to study them at arm’s length.

Diving Princess Alice Bank

Manta Ray, or Mobula tarapacana, glide through the Atlantic at Princess Alice Bank, Azores. Princess Alice Bank is a volcanic seamount on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge rising from more than two thousand metres to a depth of around 40 metres below the ocean surface.

Princess Alice Bank at the Azores is a volcanic seamount on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge rising from more than thousand metres to a depth of around 40 metres below the ocean surface. The abundance of marine life, especially manta rays, make it an exquisite, albeit remote and exposed offshore spot for diving. 

A Snoot for my Underwater Flash

A flash evenly illuminates the scene. However, the lighting is to broad to isolate the subject and make it stand out. With the use of a snoot, the light beam of the flash is narrowed. Using pipe fittings, a reduction in the light beam is achieved. Small pieces of black straws (unfinished) further concentrate the light beam.

It’s the light that makes a photograph. The principle also applies to underwater photography. Sunlight penetrates water. However, only twenty percent makes it to a depth of ten metres. Less than one percent of sunlight reaches the ocean at 100 metres depth. To make things more difficult, water filters the warmer side of the light spectrum…… Continue reading A Snoot for my Underwater Flash

Ghost Goby

A common Ghost Goby (Pleurosicya mossambica) measuring just a few millimetres swims on a coral, Strait of Mozambique.

Gobies are small and secretive. Many of the more than 1600 goby species are never seen, although gobies are the largest family of marine fish. Gobies can be mistaken for blennies; the latter have a single continuous dorsal fin, whereas gobies have two separate fins. A common Ghost Goby (Pleurosicya mossambica) measuring just a few…… Continue reading Ghost Goby

Autumn Leaves

Leafs swim on the river Aare in Switzerland.

For this year’s autumn leaves photo, I used some trickery. In fact, the picture is turned upside down… The water surface creates nice reflections of the beech tree leaves.

Underwater Photography in the Strait of Mozambique

A spotted porcelain crab (Neopetrolisthes maculatus) sits among the stinging tentacles of an anemone, Memba Bay, Strait of Mozambique.

Nature is generous. It gives without expecting anything in return. Generally, there’s a higher-level system ensuring the balance of its parts. These underwater photographs taken in the Strait of Mozambique try to explore some of these coexistences. Take the case of the sea anemone who has several subtenants. There’s typically a pair of anemonefish, as well…… Continue reading Underwater Photography in the Strait of Mozambique

Pipefish

Pipefish, Memba Bay, Strait of Mozambique.

Pipefish are hard to spot underwater, as they have excellent camouflage. They slowly drift over the seabed with the current, and you can easily take them for a stick or dead branch. Pipefish are related to seahorses. They belong to the same family of Syngnathidae, hence they share the same long tubelike snout. Just like…… Continue reading Pipefish